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Keyword – The words or phrases a person types into a search box. Also refers to the word or phrase a site owner wants to be found under.

Search Engine Results Pages (SERP’s) [link:] rank indexed sites according to how relevant they are in relation to the search query (most relevant to least relevant).

Long tail [link:] and brand [link:] related keywords are typically worth more than shorter and vague keywords because they typically occur later in the buying cycle and are associated with a greater level of implied intent.

Keyword Density – An old measure of search engine relevancy based on how prominent keywords appeared within the content of a page. Keyword density is no longer a valid measure of relevancy over a broad open search index though.

When people use keyword stuffed copy it tends to read mechanically (and thus does not convert well and is not link worthy); plus some pages that are crafted with just the core keyword in mind often lack semantically related words and modifiers from the related vocabulary (and that causes the pages to rank poorly as well).

The keyword density formula is the total number of keyword mentions divided by the total number of words on a page. Traditionally it has been said that keywords should fall between 2 and 8% density (although this is not a heavily-used factor anymore).

See also:

Keyword Effectiveness Index (KEI) – Keyword effectiveness index: A mathematical representation of the popularity of a keyword compared to its popularity mesured as the number of pages in a search engines index.

KEI is a statistical formulation that reveals the most effective keyword phrases and terms to use in optimize your web pages for. Efficiency can be many things. According to KEI, it is efficient to optimize for keywords that have many searchers, but only a few competing pages.

The lower the KEI, the more popular your keywords are, and the less competition they have. That means that you might have a better chance of getting to the top in the search engines and receive a good number of searchers for your effort.

Example: Suppose the number of searches for a keyword is 821 per day and Google displays 224,234 results (pages) for that keyword. Then the ratio between the popularity and competitiveness for that keyword is:

Keyword Effectiveness Index Example #1

Example of the opposite: Suppose the number of searches for a keyword is 2 per day and Google displays 11,224,234 results (pages) for that keyword. Then the ratio between the popularity and competitiveness for that keyword is:

Keyword Effectiveness Index Example #2

Explanation: According to the KEI definition, the best keywords are those that have many searches and that don’t have much competition in the search results. A low KEI is therefore preferable.

Keyword Proximity – How close keywords are to each other on web pages.

Keyword Research – The process of discovering relevant keywords and keyword phrases to focus your SEO and PPC marketing campaigns on.

Examples of keyword research & discovery methods:

  • Using keyword research tools [link:].
  • Reviewing analytics data [link:] or server logs [link:].
  • Analyzing ad copy and tags on competing websites.
  • Reviewing consumer feedback.
  • Interacting with customers to understand how/why the found and/or chose your business.

Keyword Research Tools – Tools which help you discover potential keywords based on past search volumes, search trends, bid prices, and page content from related websites.

Some popular keyword research tools:

Please note that most keyword research tools used alone are going to be highly inaccurate at giving exact quantitative search volumes. The tools are better for qualitative measurements. To test the exact volume for a keyword it may make sense to set up a test Google AdWords [link:] campaign.

Keyword Stuffing – Writing copy that uses excessive amounts of the core keyword(s) and is usually written in a very unnatural, robotic fashion.

When people use keyword stuffed copy it tends to read mechanically (and thus does not convert well and is not link worthy); plus some pages that are crafted with just the core keyword in mind often lack semantically related words and modifiers from the related vocabulary (and that causes the pages to rank poorly as well).

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

KPIs help organizations achieve organizational goals through the definition and measurement of progress. The key indicators are agreed upon by an organization and are indicators which can be measured that will reflect success factors. The KPIs selected must reflect the organization’s goals, they must be key to its success, and they must be measurable. Key performance indicators usually are long-term considerations for an organization.”

Key phrase (or keyword phrase)

a search phrase made up of keywords. See “keyword.” 

Keyword

a word that a search engine user might use to find relevant web page(s). If a keyword doesn’t appear anywhere in the text of your web page, it’s highly unlikely your page will appear in the search results (unless of course you have bid on that keyword in a pay-per-click search engine). 

Keyword density

the number of occurrences that a given keyword appears on a web page. The more times that a given word appears on your page (within reason), the more weight that word is assigned by the search engine when that word matches a keyword search done by a search

Keyword Matching

Keyword matching is the process of selecting and providing advertising or information that match the user’s search query.

There are four types of keyword matching including:

Broad Match 
Exact Match
Phrase Match
Negative Keyword  

Keyword popularity

the number of occurrences of searches done by Internet users of a given keyword during a period of time. Both WordTracker.com and Overture’s Keyword Selector Tool (http://inventory.overture.com) provide keyword popularity numbers.

Keyword prominence

the location (i.e. placement) of a given keyword in the HTML source code of a web page. The higher up in the page a particular word is, the more prominent it is and thus the more weight that word is assigned by the search engine when that word matches a keyword search done by a search engine user. Consequently, it’s best to have your first paragraph be chock full of important keywords rather than superfluous marketingspeak. This concept also applies to the location of important keywords within individual HTML tags, such as heading tags, title tags, or hyperlink text. So get in the habit of starting off your title tags with a good keyword rather than “Welcome to.”

Keyword research

Determining the words and phrases that people use to find something, then compiling them into a list for use on web pages, etc.

Keyword stuffing

Placing excessive amounts of keywords into the page copy and the HTML in such a way that it detracts from the readability and usability of a given page for the purpose of boosting the page’s rankings in the search engines. This includes hiding keywords on the page by making the text the same color as the background, hiding keywords in comment tags, overfilling alt tags with long strings of keywords, etc. Keyword stuffing is just another shady way of gaming the search engines and, as such, its use should be strongly discouraged.

Keyword-rich

when a given page or bit of text is chock full of good keywords rather than a bunch of meaningless words (e.g. “welcome”, “click here”) or irrelevant words (e.g. “solution”).